Legal and sworn translations

Giving legal validity to documents destined for foreign markets

Translations that stand up to bureaucracy

Certification and legalisation

Faithful legal translations that correspond to the original documents

In order for a document with legal validity to be used in a foreign country, its faithfulness to the original must be certified. Through certification, also known as sworn translation, and by means of legalisation/apostille (when requested), the translator officially assumes responsibility for the translation, thus giving the translated document the same legal validity as the original.

SWORN TRANSLATIONS: WHEN ARE THEY NEEDED?

Businesses, throughout their existence, frequently find themselves having to deal with bureaucracy. Legal documents often cross the desks of company executives and managers or those of consultants in the legal department.

In some cases, especially when companies are also developing their business in foreign markets, a certification and/or legalisation/apostille can be required in addition to translation, depending on the country for which the document is intended.

OUR LEGAL AND SWORN TRANSLATION SERVICES

To meet certification requirements, our translators are enrolled in the Register of Technical Experts at Italian Courts. In addition to sworn translations, we also handle documents’ subsequent legalisation/apostille, for any intended use (at embassies, consulates or international law firms).

A sworn translation is one that is authenticated by a court, a notary or a consular officer once the native-speaker translator who created the translation has provided an affidavit. By signing and stamping the translated document and filling out the affidavit, the translator swears:

The affidavit annexed to the translation is signed by an officer of the court (by a public notary or by a consular official), registering the document as legally valid from that moment forth.

The purpose of legalisation is to make the translated document official in the foreign country for which it is destined; it attests to the legal validity and authenticity of the signature of the public official before whom the translator took their oath.

Once the translation has been certified, it can be legalised by the proper Italian government authority (the Procuratore della Repubblica).

For countries that participate in the Hague Convention of 5 October 1961, documents are legalised using an apostille stamp.

LEGAL AND SWORN TRANSLATIONS: WHAT DOCUMENTS DO WE TRANSLATE?

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